S.E. Shires

Artist Feature: Michael Davis & Hip-Bone Music

Greetings fellow brassoholics and lovers of the great S.E. Shires company!

So happy and proud to announce the release of my 11th album as a solo artist, Hip-Bone Big Band! The project features a dream team line-up of musicians playing ten of my original compositions and two arrangements I did on a couple t’bone classics: 76 Trombones and Sentimental Over You. I hand picked my favorite jazz trombonists to help out with the solo work including Marshall Gilkes, Conrad Herwig, Michael Dease, Bob McChesney, Andy Martin and Bill Reichenbach. Considering I’m fortunate enough to play the finest small bore tenor trombone ever made, I couldn’t resist playing a few of the solo spots myself.

The ensemble is rounded out by a who’s who of the New York jazz scene including Vanguard Jazz Orchestra veterans Dick Oatts on lead alto, Nick Marchione on lead trumpet and Scott Wendholt handling the jazz trumpet chores. Steely Dan bari-man Roger Rosenberg and Paul Simon tenor-man Andy Snitzer come along for the ride while our big band bus was expertly driven by the Yellowjacket’s virtuosic drummer Will Kennedy. I feel incredibly fortunate and grateful to have all these brilliant musicians record this music.

This is the second album I’ve been privileged to record on my Shires MD and MD+ model trombones. Last year, I recorded my Bone Alone CD in which I layered all the parts myself starting with duets all the way up to tentets. To say these are the best trombones I’ve ever played is an understatement. I only wish I had them for all my previous solo efforts! One thing I can say for sure is, they will be with me on every project I do for the remainder of time.

Come check out the Hip-Bone Big Band CD at Hip-Bone Music and, while you’re there, check out our acclaimed bone2pick interview series, our Hip-Bone U online/video lessons, and all of our books for every level of brass player. Lots of cool projects on the horizon so stay tuned. Long live the Hip-Bone Big Band and S.E. Shires!

-Michael Davis

p.s. You're all invited to check out our CD Release Concert on December 4th, 2016 at SubCulture in New York City's East Village.  Stay tuned for more details, we'd love to see you there!

What does a tour at Shires look like?

It's an exciting process... turning raw materials into a beautifully hand crafted instrument.  We've been perfecting our process for over twenty years and we're proud of the work that we do, the skilled craftsmen and craftswomen that choose to be a part of our team, and our desire to continually strive to create an instrument that our customers will cherish.

Maybe you've had the chance to visit us in person: you made an appointment to come and have a custom trombone or trumpet fitting with one of our experts.  You've toured the shop, you've seen Steve Shires spin a bass trombone bell, you've seen our team building a trumpet right in front of your eyes.

Maybe you've watched one of the TV segments we've been featured on in the past few years.  Discovery Channel and Science Channel have both come to us directly to document the process...How Its Made-Trombones       How Does a Photo Copier Become a Trumpet?

But maybe you haven't had the chance to really see the inside of a custom brass factory.  The whirring machines, the determined look on our craftsmen's faces as they solder and assemble a delicate part of an instrument, the giant rolls of brass that will be sculpted into your future alto trombone bell.

We pride ourselves on designing and creating custom brass instruments that give musicians more than just a tool to use for music making.  Our handcrafted approach to instrument building combines the highest standards of modern manufacturing with the practices of old world craftsmanship to create a unique and handcrafted instrument that is  built just for you.

We fabricate, assemble, and finish every instrument onsite in our Massachusetts factory because we know that every stage of building affects the way that an instrument plays.  The taper and weight of the bell, the alloy of the metal, the shape of the valve ports and the size of the bead wire...and hundreds of other considerations. By controlling these processes in house, we gain an intimate knowledge and mastery over every facet of our instruments.

Tours are always available if you're in Massachusetts and you'd like to see the factory for yourself.  We're proud of what we do and we love to share that with our brass playing friends!